View from the top of Sharp Island

Sail to Sharp Island, Hong Kong

Hong Kong is such a wonderful place to visit, offering so much diversity both culturally and geologically. Whilst most visitors enjoy Hong Kong as a short city stopover, there’s a lot more to it than the usual hustle, bustle and huge shopping malls.

Hong Kong is actually a hiker’s delight with a multitude of hiking trails to satisfy all levels of fitness alongside beautiful backdrops that will take your breath away.

Explore Sharp Island

ScrubySnacks recently set out to explore the island of Kiu Tsui Chau, also known as Sharp Island. At around 2.5km in length, Sharp Island is located in Hong Kong’s Global Geopark, to the South East of Sai Kung.

Kaito to Sharp Island
Our ‘kaito’ to Sharp Island

Getting There

From Diamond Hill MTR station, we took the Number 92 bus to Sai Kung Public Pier (around 30 mins), where we swiftly boarded a ‘kaito’ or small motorised ferry (HKD50 return per person) to make the relaxing 15 minute cruise to Sharp Island Pier. On arrival we turned right and started the Geo Trail to Hap Mun Bay which took just over an hour to complete. We made our way up the narrow pathways and relatively steep incline through lush, green vegetation, finally making it to the top of the island. Here we gasped as we took in the incredible 360 view over Hap Mun Bay, Kiu Tsui Beach, the islet of Kiu Tau, as well as Clearwater Bay.

Kiu Tsui to Hap Mun Bay
Hike from Kiu Tsui to Hap Mun Bay
View from the top of Sharp Island
Sharp Island scenery
Half Moon Bay
Hap Mun Bay Beach

Discover Hap Mun Bay

After a few photos and a much needed water break, we commenced our descent towards the pristine beach of Hap Mun Bay, also known as Half Moon Bay. We wasted no time in stripping down to our swimmers, rewarding ourselves with an energizing dip in the glorious sparkling blue waters of the bay. Hap Mun Bay Beach is extremely well maintained, offering changing facilities, showers and a kiosk selling all the necessary refreshments required for a roasting hot day.

Just as we were about to commence our hike back to Sharp Island Pier to catch our return sailing, we spotted our original kaito and driver approaching the Bay just by the beach. We ran over to speak to her and she explained that we could pay an extra HKD20 which would allow us to hop back on board and return to Sai Kung without hiking back to our original collection point. We were more than happy to take this option, and glad we did as our bonus journey took us on a tour around the whole island to see some fantastic volcanic rock formations and hidden caves, before eventually returning to Sai Kung Pier.

Volcanic rock formations
Volcanic rock formations and caves

Sai Kung Pier

On arrival, we waved off our lovely kaito driver and took a stroll along the pretty promenade, where we noticed a row of local fishermen selling fresh seafood from their small ‘sampans’ or fishing boats to the punters located high above on the pier. The harbour greeted us with a fine selection of cafes, restaurants and al fresco dining options and we finally settled down for a cold beverage and a bite to eat, accompanied by the glistening of the surrounding waters and the faint hum of the kaitos passing by.

Fishermen at Sail Kung
Seafood for sale at Sai Kung
Sai Kung Pier
View from Sai Kung Pier

ScrubySnacks Top Tips:

Make sure you set off nice and early to complete the hike on Sharp Island well before the midday sun. This will also give you time to relax by the beach and return before the last kaito departs back to Sai Kung at around 5pm. Don’t forget to pack water and a few snacks for the hike too.

If you happen to visit Kiu Tsui Beach on Sharp Island during low tide, you can actually walk across the natural sand levee or tombolo, to the small islet of Kiu Tau.

It’s also worth taking your snorkeling gear when you visit Hap Mun Bay Beach as there’s an abundance of marine life to enjoy below the water’s surface.

Tombolo to Kiu Tau
Kiu Tau and the sand crossing from Sharp Island
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